Seasons of War and Peace

We can always count on the seasons to change. Just like the day and night, winter always follows fall, summer always follows spring; for us here in The Great White North, summer cannot come soon enough after the winter we have just had.

After around March 21st we see daylight more than darkness, June 21st being the day with the longest duration of sunlight. On the flip-side, in near late September the darkness overpowers the sunlight and around December 21st darkness is at it’s peak. This pattern is recognized to be guaranteed. The abundant sunlight will never last forever, and even the darkest day will never reign.

 

(And because I just have to…)

#yinyang #nature is everywhere

A post shared by Ahmad Iqbal (@ahmiq) on

 

These same rules of nature also apply to all things within it. Individuals, civilizations, businesses, etc.

The Hero’s Journey, coined by Joseph Campbell, is the perfect formula to help conceptualize this idea for ourselves as human beings. We all go through ups and downs because life is changing and evolving. New “missions” and obstacles come up every day and we may have dozens if not hundreds of journey’s happening at any one time, some more significant than others. And as long as one continues to “live” the unknown world will eventually become known and internalized. Every main character in any popular story ever told follows this formula. Harry Potter, Luke Skywalker, Katniss Everdeen, even Homer Simpson in every episode. I believe we love these characters because they fit nature’s formula.

 

With regards to civilizations and nations, the macrocosm of individuals, we also see ups and downs. Civilizations and ways of life also breathe as shown in the graph of the history of balance of power. The United States was at i’s peak “peacetime” state, an obvious “summertime” and growth state, around 1950. China was at it’s lowest; struggling and stuck in a wintertime state. But nature’s change eventually prevails and balances are shifted.

The same is also true for businesses. I read somewhere the average life expectancy of a company (probably around the 1950s) used to be 60 years. A decade or so ago that number was around 25 years. Currently it is at around 15 years, and contracting still. In this case not only is the environment changing, but the speed of change is also changing. In Ben Horowitz’s book, “The Hard Thing About Hard Things” he talks about his views on Google’s decision to change their CEO in 2011. Eric Schmidt had led Google to be one of the most powerful companies in the world, taking over essentially when they were still relatively unknown startup about to go through an IPO. After 10 years, Larry Page, the co-founder, steps in to take over. Why would the board decide to change leadership when the CEO had a proven track record of growth? Ben Horowitz argues because the environment for Google was changing to be more of a Wartime landscape with the rise of Facebook, Apple, Twitter and the 2nd renaissance of Tech. Eric Schmidt was a great Peacetime CEO, someone who could leverage the Summer and keep things growing. But Larry Page is a Wartime CEO, pragmatic and focused on re-building and investing for the future.

What I mean to share with this post is that these patterns exist everywhere. We are all parts of a greater whole, and the seasons are a reminder for us. For those of us who complain about the winters (however cold they are), think of it as a reminder of our our journey. And for those that love the summer, don’t get too comfortable because nature won’t let it stay that way forever.

Filling the Gap with Technology

The launch of the Apple iWatch, and the Android Wear series before that, ushers in a new era of human-computer integration with attached mobile devices. Many people suggest there is not much difference between seeing a text message on your wrist, from pulling your phone out of your pocket, turning on the display, and viewing the message; that humanity is getting too lazy if this is what we have come to ask for from our technology. But I would look at this from the perception that humanity is asking for something else out of non-interruption technology. We’re asking to be made more complete.

If you think about it, we are technology; we are bio(nano)-technology. Technology has gone from something that was far removed from us, to something that is attached to us. Maybe we just long to upgrade our natural built-in applications and platforms with electronic software and hardware.

 

Back in the day, computers were huge expensive machines that were rare and hard to access. They were the size of whole rooms, their time had to be rented and booked days or weeks ahead of time, and then travelling to, likely miles and miles away. Now, machines with much more power and access to information are in our pockets – with remarkably less interruption. Additionally, technology is becoming more unique to it’s master. Back in the day there was a severe lack of variety. There were only a few makes and models, and the operating system and software was fixed. Today we have a variety of devices, with even more variety of software. They are becoming more unique to their master; if you and your friend both had the same smartphone, trading phones would physically hurt, it wouldn’t feel like your phone and would have less utility to you.

I find myself thinking of PCs as Stairs, and Wearables as moreof a Ramp. The stairs have interruptions, but a ramp is smooth and integrated. Technology will get more and more analog. Moving closer and closer to our life force. Filling a never ending gap in our humanity.