Filling the Gap with Technology

The launch of the Apple iWatch, and the Android Wear series before that, ushers in a new era of human-computer integration with attached mobile devices. Many people suggest there is not much difference between seeing a text message on your wrist, from pulling your phone out of your pocket, turning on the display, and viewing the message; that humanity is getting too lazy if this is what we have come to ask for from our technology. But I would look at this from the perception that humanity is asking for something else out of non-interruption technology. We’re asking to be made more complete.

If you think about it, we are technology; we are bio(nano)-technology. Technology has gone from something that was far removed from us, to something that is attached to us. Maybe we just long to upgrade our natural built-in applications and platforms with electronic software and hardware.

 

Back in the day, computers were huge expensive machines that were rare and hard to access. They were the size of whole rooms, their time had to be rented and booked days or weeks ahead of time, and then travelling to, likely miles and miles away. Now, machines with much more power and access to information are in our pockets – with remarkably less interruption. Additionally, technology is becoming more unique to it’s master. Back in the day there was a severe lack of variety. There were only a few makes and models, and the operating system and software was fixed. Today we have a variety of devices, with even more variety of software. They are becoming more unique to their master; if you and your friend both had the same smartphone, trading phones would physically hurt, it wouldn’t feel like your phone and would have less utility to you.

I find myself thinking of PCs as Stairs, and Wearables as moreof a Ramp. The stairs have interruptions, but a ramp is smooth and integrated. Technology will get more and more analog. Moving closer and closer to our life force. Filling a never ending gap in our humanity.

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Minimum Viable Time Travel

The idea of having a time machine has lingered in our imaginations for a long time. But we also know it will be pretty impossible to go backwards or forward in time from the technical perspective. Not only do many mathematicians and renowned physicists say it’s impossible, but even thinking about the implications blows our minds so much we probably can’t even understand how one would get started on solving this problem.

Surely, we understand a time machine isn’t as simple of a technical problem, as lets say a federal government health care website (in that the engineering solutions are known), it could still be “hacked” in some crude form. And by “Hack” I mean a crudely and quickly putting together system that could deliver the objective.

So maybe a hack exists. Just mental time travel. Rather than space-time travel.

Some possible reasons for time travel:

1. To make smarter decisions (give myself advice)

2. Help others

3. Save time

4. Nostalgia (re-live the glory days)

Time travel seems to be thought of a physical journey, but what if it was purely mental or emotional – I think it’s possible to meet these outcomes without having to deal with 3 dimensional time travel.

I think the personal diary, or a time-capsule, blog, or annotations like the ones from Genius.com, fits this kind of framework.

By keeping a diary someone can revisit the past to learn from failure or success. The past can also provide the previous perspective they may have lost over the years (make smarter decisions/give myself advice).

Annotations are the other way, where they help the next person “forward through history” since your experience added additional information to the literature they were reading (saving them time from having to research the item themselves and potentially make a mistake). This also helps other people.

By leveraging technology and good note taking, I think we can all experience some benefits of time travel.

 

The Origin of the Word “Technology”

Systematic Treatment of a Craft.

Any tool is technology. A pen is technology. Paper is technology. A desk is technology. When these tools were adopted they provided a new way of systemizing an activity and opening up our brains to focus on other things. Perhaps a better phrase for these examples would be in the past tense?

“A desk was technology, but today, technology is the new phablet or self-driving car.”

Something doesn’t feel right about this statement. Even now, if I don’t have access to a desk and I need to work – I would view that desk as a piece of technology.

Technology is an extension of ourselves so that we can focus on higher order issues and problems.